Europe, Military Postcards, Postcards

Now quartered [1945 – A.P.O. Germany]

WWII Postcard Austria 1945 image lg

George found himself in a quaint alpine village in the late summer of 1945. The picturesque village of Reit im Winkl is a small German town near the Austrian border with a strong tradition of tourism. No rank or unit is given on this card, but the postcard was stamped at APO 527.

WWII Postcard Austria 1945 message lg

August 17

We are now quartered in this little Alpine village. We are really miles from no where. They say the snow here is terrific gets to 8′ deep in the village. Don’t you think the Alps look beautiful?

George

Postmark: U.S. Army Postal Service A.P.0 572 – 25 Aug 1945

To: Miss Olga Schleichen | 450 N. Pine St. | Indianapolis, Indiana

Image description: Reit im Winkl mit Keisergebirge 2344m


Reit im Winkl

An alpine community in the Southeast corner of modern Germany, to this day, the town has no rail connection (source), but remains a popular destination for winter and summer outdoor sports.

Reit im Winkl Tourist Information

Wikipedia

Europe, Postcards

On a Budget [1990 – Stockholm, Sweden]

Stockholm Postcard 1990 image lg

World traveling on a budget isn’t easy, but this family seems to have enjoyed their visit.

This is how we all shared our adventures with friends and family before Facebook and Instagram changed everything, for better or worse.

Stockholm Postcard 1990 message lg

Dear Sue & Gene,

Thanks for your letter. You’re right Stockholm & Sweden are beautiful. The train ride here was very scenic. Lots of lakes & forests. Dad says it reminds him of his uncle’s properties in Canada.

Most of the affordable hotels were full, now we are staying in a private apartment. It has a beautiful view of the City Hall.

Hope spring finds you both well & happy. I know you’ll be busy. “Hello to Jen & Helen”

Love, Dad, Linda, Sean & Patrick

Postmark: Stockholm, Sweden – April 23, 1990

Europe, Postcards

Before and After [1937 – Fleet Street, London]

1920 Postcard Image - Fleet Street London lg

Featuring an Interwar photograph of St. Clement Danes Church and Fleet Street in London, this postcard proves that worthwhile correspondence can be short. Designed by famed architect Sir Christopher Wren, the church was severely damaged in World War II bombing raids of London. In 1958, St Clement Danes became the Central Church of the Royal Air Force with features inside and out, commemorating units and individual members of the RAF (Wikipedia).

1920 Postcard Message - Fleet Street London lg

Best Wishes

To: Nashville, Tenn U.S.A.

Postmark: London, 6 Sep 1937 “Post Early in the Day”


More About St Clement Danes

Ablaze after German Blitz May 10, 1941

Continue reading “Before and After [1937 – Fleet Street, London]”

Europe, Military Postcards, Postcards

I got your clock. [1954 – U.S. Army Air Force, London]

1954 U.S. Army Air Force Postcard - London Image lg

The postmark caught my eye on this one. Ray sent this card from a military post office, presumably RAF Lakenheath (APO 09179). It’s a military post mark, which reads: “U.S. Army Air Force Postal Service,” and apparently was still being used long after the separate “U.S. Air Force” was created in 1947. The U.S. Air Force, to this day, maintains a presence at RAF Lakenheath (http://www.lakenheath.af.mil/).

1954 U.S. Army Air Force Postcard - London message lg

Hi Folks.

I got your clock shiped it about 3 weeks ago. You should get it sometime next month. It is insured in case anything is broken.

Ray.

To:
Mr. Wallace King
Route 2
Crofton, KY

Postmark: U.S. Army Air Force Postal Service 179  – 27 October 1954

Image: London, The Houses of Parliament

Europe, Military Postcards, Postcards

No sign of moving yet [1919 – Bar-le-Duc, France]

Great War Postcard Feb 1919 back lg

The Treaty of Versailles had not yet been signed, but Umberger can certainly see the light at the end of the tunnel. With a location-less postmark from the U.S. Army Postal Service, there’s no telling exactly from where in Europe this postcard was sent.  Umberger would likely have been in the vicinity of Bar-le-Duc at some point to have acquired the image of this town in Northwest France. Hopefully he arrived back on American soil not long after his postcard did.

I have two postcards from this WWI soldier, A.C. Umberger. Here is the other, sent in March 1919.

Great War Postcard Feb 1919 lg

A pretty nice place. Hope to be home soon to play with you but there is no sign of moving yet.

Yours

A.C. Umberger

To:

  • Miss Jean T. Hunter
  • 326 E. Bucynus St.
  • Crestline, Ohio
  • U.S.A.

Postmark: U.S. Army Postal Service, Feb 18, 1919 / “Passed as censored” stamp

Image: Bar-le-Duc

Europe, Military Postcards, Postcards

Another view of the Castle [1919 – Marseilles, France]

Great War Postcard Mar 1919 back lg

Through some quick census research, I’m fairly sure this postcard was sent by Herbert to his father. It boggles my mind that this postcard was sent nearly a century ago.

Tarascon-sur-Rhone Wikipedia

Great War Postcard Mar 1919 lg

Another view of the Castle. Am on my way to Taulon and St Raphael. Am in Marsailles now.

Yours

A. C. Umberger

To:

  • Mr. G. E. Umberger
  • 326 E. Bucyrus St.
  • Crestline, Ohio

From:

  • Herbert C. Umberger

Postmark: U.S. Army Post Office M.P.F.S. Mar 20, 1919

Europe, Postcards

Too much English in Paris [1950 – Paris, France]

1950 Paris Notre Dame Image lg

It’s so much fun to imagine Rilla’s trip across the pond and stay in Paris (minus being surrounded by seasick passengers). I’m not sure whether I admire her desire to integrate herself into French culture, or if she’s instead a little self-impressed with her own mastery of the local language.

Here’s a bit of historical context: The French Line in the 1950s.

1950 Paris Notre Dame message lg

Sept 30, 1950

Dear Margaret,

The ocean trip was wonderful. I love the French line. The food was out of this world. 6 courses for each meal. I was fortunate enough not to be seasick in spite of a storm the first three days which got most everybody.

I love Paris, but haven’t seen many of the sights yet. I’ve been room-hunting for a place in a private home. There’s too much English spoken at the Maison Américaine, a dormitory where I am now. It’s very cold here. Write.

Love, Rilla

To:

  • Miss Margaret Paschall
  • Route 2
  • Clarksville, Tenn.
  • U.S.A

Postmark: Paris XIV Av du General Leclerc – Sept 30, 1950

Stamps: 5 franc & 10 franc

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Europe, Other Locations, Postcards

Affectionate Brother [India – London, 1908]

london-1908

More than a century ago, Fred sent this simple note to his sister in London from somewhere in colonial India. The building pictured on this card still exists at Mount Abu. See the modern building here: http://camahotelsindia.com/camarajputana/ The politics of colonialism are sticky subject at best, but that doesn’t take away from this being a snapshot of an interesting time period in history.

My favorite line: “I remain your affectionate Brother.” Siblings simply don’t address each other with such flowery language anymore. I am as grateful for the advance of modernity as the next gal, but text messages and twitter don’t compare to a quick handwritten message like this one.

If you can identify the postmark, please let me know!

london-1908-m

Image: “Mount, abu Club.”

Ds. W.

Just a few lines in answer to your letter hoping this will find you quite well as I am alright at present. Excuse card[.] will right letter next week[.] hoping Lizzie is quite well.

I remain your affectionate Brother Fred

To:

  • Ms. W. Ellens
  • 16 Lowndes Squ
  • Knightsbridge
  • London SW
  • England

Postmark: LONDON.S.W. Nov 9, 1908

Illegible Postmark (India) BOL–? (Stamp missing.)

 

Europe, Postcards

Rain [Switzerland, 1966]

switzerland-1966-p

Intriguing because of its brevity, this postcard was presumably sent to make the recipient aware that the sender made it to Switzerland. The Liebensbergers clearly knew about this trip ahead of time, but they don’t know much more after reading this note.

switzerland-1966-m

Rain the first day.

  • Gw.
  • Mr. & Mrs. Paul Leibensperger
  • 201 9th St.
  • Shoemakersville, PA. 19555
  • U.S.A.

 

Postmark: Luzern, Switzerland – November 11, 1966

Image: Luzern, Kapellbrücke mit Pilatus (Luzerner Tracht) [Luzern, Chapel bridge with traditional dress]

Europe, Military Postcards, Postcards

The Great War [1919, France]

great-war-postcard-apr-1919-backWartime postcards are among my favorite finds. This one features two famous Parisian landmarks on the reverse.

The Treaty of Versailles had been signed and Armistice Day was not far off when this postcard was censored by a U.S. Army Captain. The Great War was all but over for this soldier who apparently had some free time to visit Brussels. I can’t imagine what harrowing things he experienced during his service in Europe, but I am glad he seemed to make it through.

More information about WWI postcards via the Smithsonian National Postal Museum: http://arago.si.edu/record_76880_img_1.html

great-war-postcard-apr-1919

France Apr 8/19

Your kind letter received and was very glad to hear from you. Had a pleasant visit to Brussels Belg. and Paris. Oh you Paris. Hope this finds you well.

From

Ges[?]

Censored by Captain U.S. Army

To:

  • Mrs. R. P. Alexander
  • 3344 Ruckle St
  • Indianapolis, Ind. USA

Postmark: U.S. Army  with “Passed as Censored” Stamp

Image: Place de la Concorde, Paris. Obelisk with the Arc de Triomphe in the distance.

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