Medical, United States

Had My Operation [1942 – Excelsior Springs, MO]

Excelsior Springs, Mo 1942- Medical Postcard lg

Though occasionally vacation postcards can be entertaining, they often contain the most ironically mundane commentary regarding the weather or scheduling. I find the most interesting postcards are the ones that involve births, deaths, marriages, relocations, war, homecomings, graduations, illness, and even lost pets. Those are the ones where I find the most interesting tidbits of individual humanity and anthropology on a larger scale.

An article published in 2005 by the U.S. National Library of Medicine notes “Not only can the illustrations on postcards reveal a considerable amount of information about hospitals in the early twentieth century, but the messages, addresses, postmarks, and stamps can also offer a glimpse of the lives of ordinary citizens and their perceptions of the health care system.” (https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1175805/)

Here we read about one such hospital experience. The sender expresses relief in having made it through surgery, and makes note of the diversity of her fellow patients inside McCleary Hospital near Kansas City, Missouri. I think most people have mixed feelings about hospitals — perhaps, not thrilled about yourself or a family member falling ill, but grateful to have a hospital where you can seek care. I’m glad that Mrs. Goetsch seems to have had a mostly positive hospital stay.

Excelsior Springs, Mo 1942- Medical Postcard message lg

Dear Mable,

Here is the place I am and I guess the place to get well. Had my operation and am over the worst I hope so. Sure meet people from all over the country, young and old, fat and small. Hope from now I will feel better.

Mrs. Goetsch

Postmark: Excelsior Springs, Missouri – May 18, 1942

To: Mrs. Mable Kueck – Janesville, Wisconsin

 


Kansas City Patient 1948
Patient receiving care in Kansas City, Missouri in 1948. Flickr, The Commons

 

McCleary Thornton Minor Hospital

McCleary Clinic and Hospital remains in existence as McCleary – Thornton – Minor Hospital in Excelsior Springs.

History of McCleary Clinic and Hospital

 

Military Postcards, Postcards, United States

Reception Committee [1943 – Jefferson Barracks, Missouri]

1943 Comic Postcard Image - Jefferson Bks Missouri lg

Who is Sergeant Graves? And why is he after Dick Chapman? Why is the quality of the milk important information to share? Was Pvt Chapman a fabled milk man before he was drafted or enlisted to serve?

Also, I’m not sure how I feel about the artwork. Are they jeering or cheering? Both?

So many questions.

1943 Comic Postcard Message - Jefferson Bks Missouri lg

Dear Tyson,

I am a Pvt in the Air Corps. Sgt Graves hasn’t got me yet. Tell everyone Hello. Milk out here is good.

Dick

To: Mr. Felix Tyson / c/o Crescent Hill Milk Service / Gallatin, Tennessee

From: Pvt R. Q. Chapman, Sqd. A 24 L. G.
Army Air Corps
Jefferson Barracks, Missouri

Postmark: Jefferson Barracks, Missouri – March 23, 1943

Front Artwork: WWII Army Airborne Comic “They had a reception committee here to meet me!” made by Beals, Des Moines, Iowa

——————-

Related postcards

Also sent by Pvt. R. Q. Chapman:  If you don’t pull the string! [1943 – Jefferson Barracks, Missouri]

Postcards, United States

If you don’t pull the string! [1943 – Jefferson Barracks, Missouri]

1943 Postcard image - Jefferson Bks Missouri lg

“It Won’t Mean a Thing If You Don’t Pull The String!”

This bright paratrooper cartoon referencing a famous big band hit pokes fun at the serious and dangerous training service members face. On the reverse, Dick inquires about Felix’s new truck. Perhaps it was a Chevy.

I couldn’t find any information about Cpl Chapman’s unit, but Jefferson Barracks, Missouri is a small installation located on the western bank of the Mississippi River active during the Civil War and still home to Army National Guard and Air National Guard units.

1943 Postcard message - Jefferson Bks Missouri lg

Hello Tyson

Wonder how things are there now. I hear you are doing ok. How about the new truck? Wish I could be there for a while at least. Write.

Dick.

To:

  • Felix Tyson
  • Morrison, Ave
  • Gallatin, Tenn.

From:

  • Cpl. R. h. Chapman
  • 24th T. Ga.A.F.T.T.C
  • Jefferson Bks, MO.

Manufacturer: Beals, Des Moines, Iowa

References:

Jefferson Barracks, Mo Wikipedia

Military Postcards, Postcards, United States

Worn out yes, sir [1943 – St Louis, Mo.]

Marress - 1943 St Louis Image lg

Lloyd Marress WWII Postcard Series (#2 of 5)

Perhaps Buddy was on a pass for his trip to St. Louis.

Turns out, Shaw’s Garden (pictured on the card) is now the Missouri Botanical Garden.

Marress - 1943 St Louis message lg

Monday aft.

Maura B.

No, I haven’t forgotten you, have I? I’m worn out yes, sir. Will be glad to get back. Bye for now.

Buddy

From:

  • L. H. Marress
  • 21st Sqd. (Squadron)
  • Topeka, KS

To:

  • Mrs. E. Bell
  • Lobelville, Tennessee

Postmark: Saint Louis, Mo. – April 5, 1943

“Buy U.S. Savings Bonds / Ask your Postmaster”

Image: Interior, Floral Display room, Shaw’s Garden, St. Louis, Mo.


Other postcards sent by Lloyd “Buddy” Marress