North America, Postcards

Greetings from Xochimilco [1920 – Mexico]

1920 Scenic Postcard Image - Xochimilco, Mexico lg

Reasons why I find this particular postcard fascinating:

  • Name: An addressee name I’ve never heard before: “Alphild” (a traditional Norse forname)
  • Uncommon date: Postcard popularity slowed in the 1920s, so this is one of the few I have from that decade.
  • Place: Xochimilco is a fascinating location. This postcard was sent before Xochimilco was incorporated into Mexico City in 1928, and retains its distinct identity today. Chinampa is the type of traditional agriculture practice here along the canals, and is a tourist attraction as well.
  • Content:  I always enjoy reading about how the sender got to their destination, and here William H. mentions a pleasant train journey. What a train ride to Mexico City must have been like in 1920 is fascinating to imagine.

1920 Scenic Postcard Message - Xochimilco, Mexico lg

Greetings from Xochimilco Mexico. Had a very pleasant train trip to Mexico City. The weather is Simply Magnificent. How was your trip home? And how is little Alphild?

My Best William H.

  • Misses Alphild & Evanna Larson
  • 5100 S. Cornell
  • Chicago, Ill
  • U.S.A.

Postmark: 17 April 1920 – Mexico


More about the location:

Xochimilco, Early 20th Century

Xochimilco, Mexico.

Ca. 1910-1919 Source: Flickr

Image from page 154 of

Further Reading: Xochimilco Wikipedia

Postcards, United States

If you don’t pull the string! [1943 – Jefferson Barracks, Missouri]

1943 Postcard image - Jefferson Bks Missouri lg

“It Won’t Mean a Thing If You Don’t Pull The String!”

This bright paratrooper cartoon referencing a famous big band hit pokes fun at the serious and dangerous training service members face. On the reverse, Dick inquires about Felix’s new truck. Perhaps it was a Chevy.

I couldn’t find any information about Cpl Chapman’s unit, but Jefferson Barracks, Missouri is a small installation located on the western bank of the Mississippi River active during the Civil War and still home to Army National Guard and Air National Guard units.

1943 Postcard message - Jefferson Bks Missouri lg

Hello Tyson

Wonder how things are there now. I hear you are doing ok. How about the new truck? Wish I could be there for a while at least. Write.

Dick.

To:

  • Felix Tyson
  • Morrison, Ave
  • Gallatin, Tenn.

From:

  • Cpl. R. h. Chapman
  • 24th T. Ga.A.F.T.T.C
  • Jefferson Bks, MO.

Manufacturer: Beals, Des Moines, Iowa

References:

Jefferson Barracks, Mo Wikipedia

Postcards, United States

Gaye & Leo Get Hitched [1985 – Williamsburg, Va]

1985 Williamsburg, VA postcard image lg

Gaye seems to think getting married is not much of a big deal. There are many beautiful spots in Colonial Williamsburg to tie the knot, so I hope they were happy with their choice of locales. I’m sure “the kids” were glad to see her at the end of her travels. There’s no telling, however, how her new husband felt about them though. Perhaps he was a cat-guy.

1985 Williamsburg, VA postcard message lg

Dear Leonora & Jim,

Leo & I got married here in Williamsburg yesterday. Is a beautiful area. On to D.C. & Binghamton. Back in Miami Sept 16. Sent “the kids” to boarding school. Probably won’t get a meow when I return.

Love Gaye

Postmark: Richmond, Virginia September 1985

Pictured: Governor’s Palace Gardens – Colonial Williamsburg

 

 

Postcards, United States

You’uns Are Hot- We’uns Are not [1939 – North Carolina]

1939 Hendersonville NC image lg

“Having a big time.”

Billy’s sarcasm towards Annemarie is what makes 1930s postcard charming, and I think I’m going to bring that phraseology back as an alternative to “great” time. I bet it really was nice in the Blue Ridge Mountains just South of Asheville, NC in July.

In my eyes, the main quality of a great postcard is leaving the reader wanting to know more! This one certainly poses so many more questions than it answers. I want to know what’s happening off stage!

1939 Hendersonville NC message lg

Dear Annemarie-

Haven’t got enough to say to write a letter– hence the card. I’m visiting Chick now and having a big time. Guess I’ll go back to S.C. and cruise around before I come home. In the meantime try to bear up under the strain of my absence.

Billy

To:

  • Miss Annemarie Dünzelmann
  • 1118 Madison St.
  • Clarksville, Tennessee

Postmark: Hendersonville, N. C. – July 19, 1939

Military Postcards, Postcards, United States

Sgt. Marress [1943 – Topeka, Kansas]

Marress - Aug 1943 Topeka Image lg

Lloyd Marress WWII Postcard Series (#3 of 5)

August 1943

This time we find Buddy, a Sergeant now, writing to his wife in Tennessee. He most likely was serving with the 21st Bombardment Wing which was located in Topeka, Kansas as of May 1943 (Wikipedia). The primary function of Buddy’s unit was “processing heavy bombardment crews and aircraft for overseas movement, and then processing men returning from overseas, from 1942–1946.” He seems to be staying stateside for the war, so perhaps he was an aircraft mechanic or other tradesman prepping bombers for overseas deployment.

I wonder if this postcard was provided for free by the United Service Organization (USO). I’m not sure what else “U.S.O.” could possibly stand for in this context.

Link: History of the Topeka Airport (aka Topeka Army Airfield in 1943).

Marress - Aug 1943 Topeka message lg

Saturday Evening

Darling,

I’m staying on the base tonite, as I said I will. I didn’t work this aft. got caught up on my work, at last.

I hope you’re feeling alright, s–[?] the old medicine made you sick.

I’ll go now, but[?] will be back tomorrow.

Forever yours, Buddy

To:

  • Mrs. L. H. Marress
  • Lobelville, Tennessee

From:

  • Sgt. L.H. Marress
  • 21st Sq. (S)
  • Topeka, Kansas

Postmark: Aug 29, 1943 – Topeka, Kansas

Image: “From Topeka Kansas U.S.O” John Morrell & Co. Meat packing Promo Postcard featuring Kansas Jayhawk


Other postcards from Buddy Marress

Save

Military Postcards, Postcards, United States

Worn out yes, sir [1943 – St Louis, Mo.]

Marress - 1943 St Louis Image lg

Lloyd Marress WWII Postcard Series (#2 of 5)

Perhaps Buddy was on a pass for his trip to St. Louis.

Turns out, Shaw’s Garden (pictured on the card) is now the Missouri Botanical Garden.

Marress - 1943 St Louis message lg

Monday aft.

Maura B.

No, I haven’t forgotten you, have I? I’m worn out yes, sir. Will be glad to get back. Bye for now.

Buddy

From:

  • L. H. Marress
  • 21st Sqd. (Squadron)
  • Topeka, KS

To:

  • Mrs. E. Bell
  • Lobelville, Tennessee

Postmark: Saint Louis, Mo. – April 5, 1943

“Buy U.S. Savings Bonds / Ask your Postmaster”

Image: Interior, Floral Display room, Shaw’s Garden, St. Louis, Mo.


Other postcards sent by Lloyd “Buddy” Marress

Europe, Military Postcards, Postcards

Another view of the Castle [1919 – Marseilles, France]

Great War Postcard Mar 1919 back lg

Through some quick census research, I’m fairly sure this postcard was sent by Herbert to his father. It boggles my mind that this postcard was sent nearly a century ago.

Tarascon-sur-Rhone Wikipedia

Great War Postcard Mar 1919 lg

Another view of the Castle. Am on my way to Taulon and St Raphael. Am in Marsailles now.

Yours

A. C. Umberger

To:

  • Mr. G. E. Umberger
  • 326 E. Bucyrus St.
  • Crestline, Ohio

From:

  • Herbert C. Umberger

Postmark: U.S. Army Post Office M.P.F.S. Mar 20, 1919

Europe, Postcards

Too much English in Paris [1950 – Paris, France]

1950 Paris Notre Dame Image lg

It’s so much fun to imagine Rilla’s trip across the pond and stay in Paris (minus being surrounded by seasick passengers). I’m not sure whether I admire her desire to integrate herself into French culture, or if she’s instead a little self-impressed with her own mastery of the local language.

Here’s a bit of historical context: The French Line in the 1950s.

1950 Paris Notre Dame message lg

Sept 30, 1950

Dear Margaret,

The ocean trip was wonderful. I love the French line. The food was out of this world. 6 courses for each meal. I was fortunate enough not to be seasick in spite of a storm the first three days which got most everybody.

I love Paris, but haven’t seen many of the sights yet. I’ve been room-hunting for a place in a private home. There’s too much English spoken at the Maison Américaine, a dormitory where I am now. It’s very cold here. Write.

Love, Rilla

To:

  • Miss Margaret Paschall
  • Route 2
  • Clarksville, Tenn.
  • U.S.A

Postmark: Paris XIV Av du General Leclerc – Sept 30, 1950

Stamps: 5 franc & 10 franc

Save

Save

Save

North America, Postcards, United States

Sugar Cane Harvest [1956 – Cuba, via Miami]

1956 Cuba image lg

This one comes from a period of great upheaval in Cuba, but the sugar cane still needed to be harvested.

1956 Cuba message lg

Havana – Jan 20th

The sugar-cane harvest begins this week. We saw the carts being loaded as we drove from Matauzas this morning.

Love,

Grandmother

They cut with machetes. Gram

To:

  • David B. Stewart
  • 909 Woodmont Blvd.
  • Nashville, Tenn.

Postmark: Miami, Fla. – Jan 21, 1956 – Fight infant paralysis Join March of Dimes

Front image: Cutting sugar cane. Habana. Corte de Caña

Postcards, United States

Please be good boys [1961 – Washington, D.C.]

1961 Washington DC American Airlines image lg

This dad misses his sons. I miss the time before TSA screening lines.

But, this is really a very sweet postcard message from a dad.

1961 Washington DC American Airlines message lg

6:15 Sun NITE

Hi boys,

Daddy is sitting in the place while they re-fuel and take on food for our supper in Knoxville. I wish you could see the big DC-6 I’m on. And the weather is so pretty. I do wish you could have flown with me.

Please be good boys, and I’ll be writing you every single day.

Love, Daddy

To:

  • Mike & Perry Lindquist
  • Route #3
  • Portland, Tenn.

Postmark: Washington, D.C. – Nov 5, 1961

Stamp: $.07 US Air Mail

Image: American Airlines 707